Neurology Hazel Park MI

Try a wide variety of mental games, from crossword puzzles to computer games. Experts say seniors tend to do what they're good at over and over again. While that may improve proficiency, it doesn't form new neuronal connections or boost neurotransmitter production in the brain like new and diverse experiences do.

Andrew L Marcus MD
(313) 730-9100
3815 Pelham St
Dearborn, MI
Specialties
Neurology

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Dr.John Manica
(313) 343-4000
27301 Dequindre Road #314
Madison Heights, MI
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1969
Speciality
Neurologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Salahuddin Saleem Ahmad
(248) 336-9000
808 Livernois St
Ferndale, MI
Specialty
Neurology

Data Provided by:
Renee Bailey Van Stavern, MD
(313) 745-1540
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx 78284
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided by:
Franklin Edward Ellenson, MD
Huntington Woods, MI
Specialties
Neurology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided by:
Suzanne Crandall
(248) 967-7795
27351 Dequindre Rd
Madison Hts, MI
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
Zepure Kouyoumdjian
(248) 967-7795
27351 Dequindre Rd
Madison Hts, MI
Specialty
Neurosurgery

Data Provided by:
David Anderson Vincent, MD
10300 W 8 Mile Rd
Ferndale, MI
Specialties
Neurological Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided by:
Gregory Paul Van Stavern, MD
(313) 577-8900
Royal Oak, MI
Specialties
Neurology, Ophthalmology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Pa State Univ Coll Of Med, Hershey Pa 17033
Graduation Year: 1993

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Haranath Policherla
(248) 548-6400
26635 Woodward Ave
Huntington Woods, MI
Specialty
Neurology

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7 Ways to Save Your Brain

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A 2009 Mayo Clinic study found that of 1,300 people ages 70 to 89, those that had regularly engaged in mentally challenging activities, such as reading, playing games, and doing crafts, in their 50s and early 60s were 40 percent less likely to develop memory loss than those who hadn’t. Follow these simple steps to stay sharp as you age.

Hone your manual skills: Learn a new instrument, start quilting, build a model airplane, or get going on those carpentry projects you’ve been putting off. Such activities not only help promote hand and finger dexterity, they also foster the development of new neural connections.

Learn one new word every day: This engages the brain’s language centers, frontal lobe, and memory circuits. “It’s like aerobics for your brain,” says George Washington University Neurology Professor Richard Restak, MD.

Challenge your short-term memory: Although iPhones and BlackBerries may be convenient, they have one downside: They’ve robbed us of the need to commit things to memory. Do it anyway. Memorize your grocery list, your friends’ phone numbers, the US presidents in order, every state’s capital city. As the saying goes, if you don’t use it, you lose it.

Mix it up: Try a wide variety of mental games, from crossword puzzles to computer games. Experts say seniors tend to do what they’re good at—over and over again. While that may improve proficiency, it doesn’t form new neuronal connections or boost neurotransmitter production in the brain like new and diverse experiences do.

Be friendly: Engage in social activities as much as possible. Multiple studies have shown that living a solo life can vastly increase your risk of dementia. One recent Swedish study of 2,000 men and women found that people living alone at age 50 had twice the risk of developing dementia 21 years later than those who were living with a partner in middle age.

Shut the TV off: Research shows that those who watch minimal TV are as much as 50 percent less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease.

Keep working: Resist the temptation to retire early. A recent British study of 382 men found a significant association between later retirement and later onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

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